A digital marketing analyst based in Kyiv, Ukraine 🇺🇦
Telegram channel | Reading | LinkedIn | Email

Later Ctrl + ↑

Poor people

Loved the quote from the latest episode of the “Дикі мандри” podcast:

I know some people who are so poor they have nothing but money.

 72   9 mo  

Hi from Estonia

Turned out that the Ukrainian COVID-19 vaccination certificates generated via the Diia app are not working properly everywhere.

Here in Tallinn, my QR code was scanned five times, and it did’t work at two restaurants including McDonalds. The waitresses kind of saw the basic info about my vaccination but still their systems were indicating they were not allowed to let me stay in.

Looking forward to seeing whether it will work when I’ll be trying to embark on a ferry to Helsinki later today.

Noblessner Port
Noblessner Port, Tallinn
 59   9 mo  

Why to write

A quote from The Comfort Book by Matt Haig clearly articulating yet another reason of why I am pushing myself to write more:

... Nowadays, I sometimes write about what I want. The key to this is honesty. Be brutally, humiliatingly honest. I recommend this.

For instance, you could write “I want a six-pack.”

And seeing that wish on the page might automatically make you realize something about it. It might make you feel silly for having it. You might already be awakening another part of you that helps you diminish the craving. But either way, it is good to ask a single-word question after it. “Why?” Why do I want a six-pack? Then to be entirely honest in your answer. “I want to look good.” And again: “Why?” “For myself.” And then you might stare at that answer for a while and feel you weren’t being entirely honest. So you add: “To impress other people.” And then, like some incessant Socrates, ask it again: “Why?” “Because I want their approval.” “Why?” “Because I want to belong.” “Why?” And you can keep going, deeper and deeper, through the tunnel of whys, until you reach the light of realization. And the realization may be that wanting the six-pack wasn’t really about the six-pack. It wasn’t about your body. It wasn’t even about health or strength or fitness. It was about something else entirely. Something that wouldn’t be fundamentally addressed or solved by gaining the six-pack.

Writing, then, is a kind of seeing. A way to see your insecurities more clearly. A way to shine a light on doubts and dreams and realize what they are actually about. It can dissolve a whole puddle of worries in the bright light of truth.

 103   9 mo  

Telegram Instant View vs. paywalls

I’ve just noticed that Telegram Instant View can help break through the New York Times paywall. So we can read gated articles for free.

Instant View is a cool feature built into Telegram that allows to natively access site content without leaving the Telegram app. For that, the site has to be indexed by Telegram so that the app knows how to navigate the site’s layout and show the core content to end users.

Perhaps there are some other obvious or better ways to access such content without paying for it, but this one seems to be pretty easy to execute.

 169   10 mo  

Why Digital Minimalism

The purpose of this post is to structure my reason and understanding for why I stick to the Digital Minimalism concept.

What is Digital Minimalism?

As defined by Cal Newport, Digital Minimalism is a philosophy that helps you question what digital communication tools (and behaviors surrounding these tools) add the most value to your life. It is motivated by the belief that intentionally and aggressively clearing away low-value digital noise, and optimizing your use of the tools that really matter, can significantly improve your life.

What are the benefits?

I’m building on a muscle to perform focusing for a longer time and high concentration level by minimizing context switching.

Secondly, there’s a more strict information diet put in place. It helps get rid of a bad habit to constantly consume information. Such kind of activity is creating an obstacle to living with a clear state of mind and having the necessary sharpness of thinking.

How sticking to the Digital Minimalism principles reflect on a daily routine and behavior?

Speaking of social media, I’m using none of them. Although I still own a Facebook account, I don’t have there anything to scroll through as I no longer follow my Facebook friends, influencers and organizations. This way my feed is empty, and no need to enter Facebook unless I need to manage some work-related stuff. Hence no need to have the Facebook app installed on my phone.

When it comes to other entertaining services, Youtube and Tinder are the only places I still visit quite frequently. Yet not sure how to handle this addiction. Additionally, these ones are the only entertaining apps I have installed on the phone.

 66   10 mo  

How to send a file larger than 25 MB from Gmail to Kindle

This will be a reminder to my future self if I forget how to do that, or to anyone else who may find this post and have the same question.

In case of a struggle to send a more than 25 MB MOBI (.prc) file from Gmail to Kindle, use this great Amazon app called Send to Kindle which is available for Mac and PC, i.e. Windows.

 1 comment    76   10 mo  

A World Without Email – Cal Newport

My rating: 7/10

It’s the third book by Cal Newport I’ve read. It was really interesting to find here a big emphasis on the usage of Kanban board tools like Trello instead of managing projects via email. I was trying to start using Microsoft Planner, which I guess does the same things as Trello, in my work almost a year ago but didn’t succeed. Perhaps it’d worth trying again.

 1 comment    41   10 mo   books

Product and service reviews

I’ve always been that guy who pays a lot of attention to product or service reviews when making a buying decision. For me, reviews have always been such a nice indicator that made my life so much easier.

Lately I have changed my attitude regarding this. If you read reviews carefully it becomes crystal clear that lots of them are fake. No one would sit and draft a long review with a handful of super exquisite adjectives describing how great the experience of using a particular product has been. If one wanted to write a review it honestly would be very consise, dry, and, most probably, with some grammar mistakes and emojis. In short, real reviews would look like they’re written by a regular human being, not a copywriter.

Therefore, I now expect the same, moderate level of emotions and effort being put into the reviews I read anywhere on the internet. And in case I feel like the reviews are written in a “try hard” manner, I instantly lose trust in them. It actually sucks big time, because now I’m having troubles looking through marketplaces as my primary filtering behavior, meaning filtering by customer reviews, is no longer valid for me.

 28   10 mo  

Hustle culture and working time

I’ve been annoyed by a so-called hustle culture for a long time now. I keep hearing people saying something like, “Ughh, I was working for 12 hours everyday seven days a week for several months, with no vacation.” If someone says so, they are either lying, or using a wrong wording here. Actual “work” has nothing to do with it here. I don’t believe one can work, as in work requiring a creative output, for that long.

Read this book: Deep Work by Cal Newport

More to that, I’m not sure humans who are involved in knowledge work are capable of working even eight hours a day. Deep work demanding a high extent of focus and concentration is really not a joke. Four-six hours of such extensive activity will exhaust anyone pretty badly.

In general, the whole overworking and workaholism thing seems to be just a myth reinforced by youtubers aiming to hype and/or generate a tone of views and money.

 43   10 mo  

Likes and Shares teach us to express more outrage online

Social media encourages more emotional communication. Moderate and calm posts get less engagement than more radical posts. If you want to get more likes and reposts, you should add more emotions. It is quite intuitive and familiar to any active social media user. But the Yale researchers proved it with their experiment.

They researched the emotional status and engagement of 12.7 million tweets with outrage. This resulted as expected: the more reactions users received on their outrage posts, the more similar emotions their put into their subsequent posts.

Likes are the social currency of the Internet, and the position of an outraged moralist makes it easier to get this currency. Of course, such a system of motivation does not contribute to a moderate and serious discussion. It is just more useful for popularity to be more radical in your statements. And it seems that it will not be possible to change this system. Can anyone imagine Facebook, Instagram or Twitter without likes?

 42   10 mo  
Earlier Ctrl + ↓